Digital History at UHA

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The digital transformation of historical scholarship has been underway for several years and there has been a special effort to feature digital scholarship at UHA 2014.

A note on Twitter: if you’re tweeting the conference or a session, please use the hashtag #UHA2014 — it will allow everyone who is following or searching that tag to keep track of all the goings-on in Philadelphia.  Presenters should realize it’s possible that any papers or sessions could be live-tweeted.  I’ll be keeping track of things and feel free to follow along for retweets or other conversations at @lwinling.

Several panels you might be interested in:

Session 56 • Sat. 10:15‐11:45 am

Recent Work in Digital Urban History

The ARCH, Rm. 108 (First Floor)

Nathan Connolly, Johns Hopkins University — Nationalizing the HOLC Security Maps

Emily Thompson, Princeton University — Digital History, Sonic Archives, and The Roaring Twenties

Christopher Manning, Loyola University Chicago — The NOLA Oral History Project

Chair and Commentator: Mark Tebeau Arizona State University

Session 20 • Fri. 12:45‐2:15 pm

Roundtable: The Long View of Digital Urban History

Williams Hall, Rm. 1 (Ground Floor)

Colin Gordon University of Iowa

Susan Lawrence Ohio State University

Stephen Robertson George Mason University

J. Mark Souther Cleveland State University

Moderator: LaDale Winling Virginia Tech

Session 83 • Sat. 4:15‐5:45 pm

Directions in Digital History

The ARCH, Rm. 108 (First Floor)

Greg Hise University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Form and Landscape: Representing Cities in a Digital Age

Colin Gordon University of Iowa
Patterns of Urban Decline and Union Decline in St. Louis and Chicago, 1940‐2000

Elihu Rubin Yale University
Interactive Crown Street: Collective Memory and Conflicting Narratives in Public History

Chair and Commentator: Philip Ethington University of Southern California

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About LaDale Winling

LaDale Winling is assistant professor of history at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His book project, Building the Ivory Tower, examines the role of universities as urban developers in the 20th century. Learn more about him at Urban Oasis.

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